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Lightning Mobile Inc.
260 East 54th Avenue, Suite 100
Denver, Colorado 80216
copyright © 2018

As one of Colorado’s largest Property Maintenance companies, we provide professional welding services where and when you need it in all of Colorado, we offer both emergency services, as well as scheduled services at the time you need it, day, night or weekend. 24 hour service is available.

We are well versed of the onsite welding services in steel, stainless and aluminum using SMAW, GTAW, GMAW and FCAW. (Stick, TIG, MIG, Flux Core MIG) We specialize in pipeline rig welding services for oil, gas and water industries in the State of Colorado. We can weld any size of pipe, mild steel, stainless steel, handrail, heavy equipment, gates, railings, ladders, aluminum, or any other metal fabrication jobs you may have. Automotive, bumpers, tailgates, car & truck frames, fire escapes and anything that you need professionally welded.

Lightning Mobile Welding provides all the various types of welding and cutting methods that might be needed to get any project done, no matter how large. (Excepting underwater projects!) Intricate Architectural Welding and Fabrication is our Specialty!

MIG WELDING

Gas metal arc welding (GMAW), sometimes referred to by its subtypes metal inert gas (MIG) welding or metal active gas (MAG) welding, is a welding process in which an electric arc forms between a consumable wire electrode and the workpiece metal(s), which heats the workpiece metal(s), causing them to melt, and join. Along with the wire electrode, a shielding gas feeds through the welding gun, which shields the process from contaminants in the air.

The process can be semi-automatic or automatic. A constant voltage, direct current power source is most commonly used with GMAW, but constant current systems, as well as alternating current, can be used. There are four primary methods of metal transfer in GMAW, called globular, short-circuiting, spray, and pulsed-spray, each of which has distinct properties and corresponding advantages and limitations.

Originally developed for welding aluminum and other non-ferrous materials in the 1940s, GMAW was soon applied to steels because it provided faster welding time compared to other welding processes. The cost of inert gas limited its use in steels until several years later, when the use of semi-inert gases such as carbon dioxide became common. Further developments during the 1950s and 1960s gave the process more versatility and as a result, it became a highly used industrial process. Today, GMAW is the most common industrial welding process, preferred for its versatility, speed and the relative ease of adapting the process to robotic automation. Unlike welding processes that do not employ a shielding gas, such as shielded metal arc welding, it is rarely used outdoors or in other areas of air volatility. A related process, flux cored arc welding, often does not use a shielding gas, but instead employs an electrode wire that is hollow and filled with flux.

TIG WELDING

Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), also known as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, is an arc welding process that uses a non-consumable tungsten electrode to produce the weld. The weld area is protected from atmospheric contamination by an inert shielding gas (argon or helium), and a filler metal is normally used, though some welds, known as autogenous welds, do not require it. A constant-current welding power supply produces energy which is conducted across the arc through a column of highly ionized gas and metal vapors known as a plasma.

GTAW is most commonly used to weld thin sections of stainless steel and non-ferrous metals such as aluminum, magnesium, and copper alloys. The process grants the operator greater control over the weld than competing processes such as shielded metal arc welding and gas metal arc welding, allowing for stronger, higher quality welds. However, GTAW is comparatively more complex and difficult to master, and furthermore, it is significantly slower than most other welding techniques.

STICK WELDING

One of the most common types of arc welding is shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), which is also known as manual metal arc welding (MMAW) or stick welding. An electric current is used to strike an arc between the base material and a consumable electrode rod or stick. The electrode rod is made of a material that is compatible with the base material being welded and is covered with a flux that gives off vapors that serve as a shielding gas and provide a layer of slag, both of which protect the weld area from atmospheric contamination. The electrode core itself acts as filler material, making a separate filler unnecessary. The process is very versatile, requiring little operator training and inexpensive equipment. However, weld times are rather slow, since the consumable electrodes must be frequently replaced and because slag, the residue from the flux, must be chipped away after welding. Furthermore, the process is generally limited to welding ferrous materials, though specialty electrodes have made possible the welding of cast iron, nickel, aluminium, copper and other metals. The versatility of the method makes it popular in a number of applications including repair work and construction.

FLUX CORE WELDING

Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW or FCA) is a semi-automatic or automatic arc welding process. FCAW requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux and a constant-voltage or, less commonly, a constant-current welding power supply. An externally supplied shielding gas is sometimes used, but often the flux itself is relied upon to generate the necessary protection from the atmosphere, producing both gaseous protection and liquid slag protecting the weld. The process is widely used in construction because of its high welding speed and portability. FCAW was first developed in the early 1950s as an alternative to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The advantage of FCAW over SMAW is that the use of the stick electrodes used in SMAW is unnecessary. This helped FCAW to overcome many of the restrictions associated with SMAW.

The above welding information is from Wikipedia

 

24/7/365

Providing professional welding services where and when you need it in all of Colorado, we offer both emergency services, as well as scheduled services at the time you need it, day, night or weekend.

Mobile Lightning Welding is available when and where you need us, 24/7 hours are our specialty and we can be there when you need us, be it an emergency or scheduled work/maintenance.

We have both the equipment and vehicles to get to where the welding needs to be done. Boom, lift or bucket trucks are just a part of our very large fleet of specialized vehicles available to perform many different needed tasks for commercial and industrial work. A large array of industrial type equipment is at our disposal, as well as the professional mobile welding gear to get the installation done correctly the first time with the least amount of expense.

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